Phunware http://www.phunware.com Everything you need to succeed on mobile. Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:39:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 Can I Trust Beacons? http://www.phunware.com/technology/can-trust-beacons/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=can-trust-beacons#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=can-trust-beacons http://www.phunware.com/technology/can-trust-beacons/#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:40:34 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/?p=15360 The announcement of Apple’s iBeacon specification has driven a sharp increase in the awareness of beacon technology and the use of beacons in location-aware applications. Now it seems like beacons are popping up everywhere. This rise in beacon use is causing some concern and speculation among consumers. Recently, a pilot implementation of beacons by advertising […]

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Blog_Sale_Beacon

The announcement of Apple’s iBeacon specification has driven a sharp increase in the awareness of beacon technology and the use of beacons in location-aware applications. Now it seems like beacons are popping up everywhere.

This rise in beacon use is causing some concern and speculation among consumers. Recently, a pilot implementation of beacons by advertising company Titan in New York City reached all the way to the mayor’s office, due to concerns that beacons would allow Titan to track the movements of unsuspecting New Yorkers. When retail giant Macy’s announced that it would roll out beacons to all of its nearly 800 stores, Time described the initiative as “creepy.”

These fears are not unusual. New technologies often cause concern, which tends to dissipate as users become more familiar with the technology’s capabilities and benefits. Beacons are no different. Because consumers are used to the location-tracking capabilities of GPS, many assume that beacons have the power to find and identify them, and then extract their personal information or track their movements.

In reality, beacons have none of that capability.

A Beacon Is Not a Location-Tracking Device

A beacon is a small device that transmits an identifying code, essentially saying, “I’m here! I’m here! I’m here!” over and over, to any device that is programmed to listen. To interact with the beacon, a Bluetooth-enabled mobile device must be loaded with an application that will recognize the beacon’s code and trigger an interaction with the server. From there, the device and the server communicate—the beacon’s job is done.

Power to the People

The power isn’t really in the beacon; the power is in the hands of the user.

When users download an application, they do so because they believe the application will benefit them in some way, either by entertaining them, giving them information or discounts, allowing them to connect or shop, or otherwise delivering content to them that they care about. They realize that in exchange for this benefit, they must allow the application to collect information about them—that’s how the application knows what content they care about. And of course, the brand benefits as well: it gains deeper insight into its users’ demographics and buying behavior. Beacons simply help make this exchange more relevant.

With beacons, brands can instantaneously reward users with relevant benefits. Imagine taking a trip to the museum:

  1. Prior to arriving, the user downloads the museum application to his smartphone. The application asks for some identifying information and for permission to respond to Bluetooth signals.
  2. Once the user arrives at the museum, the smartphone recognizes the Bluetooth ID emitted by a beacon near the museum entrance. The smartphone understands that this ID is for the museum application and wakes up that application on the user’s phone.
  3. The museum application then sends a message welcoming the user to the museum. As the user moves through the museum, the application “hears” the call of the beacons placed at each exhibit. When the user comes within range of a beacon, the application sends detailed exhibit information directly to the user’s phone.
  4. Finally, as the user leaves the museum, the beacon at the exit broadcasts a Bluetooth ID to the mobile phone. The phone sends a message to the user thanking him for his visit and a link encouraging him to support the museum with a donation or to return for the next big exhibit.
  5. In this scenario, the Bluetooth beacon never tracked the user, nor did it transmit personal information. The beacon was only a signpost that made it possible for the application to provide the user with the location-specific benefits he requested. Personal information was always within the user’s control. Bluetooth communication was always within the user’s control.

Beacons Are Your Friend, and Friends Respect Boundaries

All friendships require honest communication and boundaries. Bluetooth beacons are no different. They can only communicate with users when they are enabled, and they only communicate to the relevant application. Beacons are the best kind of friend because the user sets the boundaries and the beacon is happy to comply.

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Living Large in Silicon Hills: 10 Fastest Growing Private Companies in Austin http://www.phunware.com/mobile-solutions/living-large-silicon-hills-10-fastest-growing-private-companies-austin/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=living-large-silicon-hills-10-fastest-growing-private-companies-austin#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=living-large-silicon-hills-10-fastest-growing-private-companies-austin http://www.phunware.com/mobile-solutions/living-large-silicon-hills-10-fastest-growing-private-companies-austin/#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:26:40 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/?p=14956 Inc. | October 16, 2014 | Will Yakowicz From an armed security team for hire firm to a single origin coffee company, check out what companies made the 2014 Inc. 5000 list from Silicon Hills. Austin may be home to powerhouses like Dell and Whole Foods Market, but it hasn’t traditionally been known as a tech […]

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Inc. | October 16, 2014 | Will Yakowicz

From an armed security team for hire firm to a single origin coffee company, check out what companies made the 2014 Inc. 5000 list from Silicon Hills.

Austin Texas

Austin may be home to powerhouses like Dell and Whole Foods Market, but it hasn’t traditionally been known as a tech hub. That all changed a few years ago, with the rise of music, film, and interactive festival South by Southwest. Though it launched in 1987, the festival has grown into an international scene–where companies go to both launch and make major announcements. In many ways, the city itself can track its progress with the must-attend affair.

This year, Austin–a.k.a. Silicon Hills–ranked fourth place on Inc.’s top 10 cities list with 87Inc. 5000 companies. If you’re looking for a warm place to incubate your startup, Austin can boast two natural resources that won’t run dry anytime soon: a talent pool fed by the University of Texas and its business-friendly income tax-free status.

The 2014 Inc. 5000 tracked company performance, including the three-year revenue growth rate, between fiscal years 2010 through 2013. Below, find out which companies in Austin grew their revenue the fastest.

1. Simpler Trading
The fastest-growing private company in Austin facilitates a membership-based suite of websites that teach users how to trade stocks and options and invest in real estate. Simpler Trading, which also provides financial data and tools to help users make money, ranks at number 21 with a 10,523 percent three-year revenue growth rate and $11.3 million in 2013 revenue. With $11.3 million in sales for 2013, the four-year-old company ranks number 2 across the Inc. 5000’s top financial services companies and number one fastest-growing company in the entire state of Texas.

2. Main Street Hub
The marketing and advertising platform has helped thousands of local businesses engage customers on social media, help protect company reputations online, and helped increase sales. Main Street Hub will set up your Facebook and Twitter profiles, manage Yelp, LinkedIn, and Foursquare pages, create unique content for those platforms written in your company’s voice, and keep track of and participate in the conversations and comments about your business online. Main Street Hub, with a 4,625 percent three-year growth rate, made $9.2 million in revenue in 2013. Founded in 2010, the company added more than 165 jobs since then and ranked number 73 on the Inc. 5000.

3. Phunware
For brands with big mobile strategies, companies like Cisco, NBC Sports, Jawbone, and WWE trust Phunware. The company, founded by Alan Knitowski, Luan Dang, and Alan Michael Kane, calls itself a Multiscreen as a Service (MaaS) company, meaning it’s a cloud-based platform that helps brands to build their own mobile apps and engage, manage, and monetize users across mobile devices. With a 4,040 percent three-year revenue growth rate, Phunware reported 2013 sales of $22.1 million. Adding 120 jobs over the period, for a total of 131 employees last spring, the two-time Inc. 5000 company made the number 82 slot for this year’s list. Just for good measure, the company is number 7 on the Inc. 5000’s top software companies category.

4. Jobs2Careers
Job search engine company Jobs2Careers attracts 11 million job seekers a month to its website. Founded by former Oracle software engineer Bruce Ge in 2007, the platform was launched in 2010 and operates on a pay-per-application advertising solution. The company made this year’s list at number 131, with a 2,830 percent three-year growth rate and pulling in $22.4 million in revenue in 2013. Jobs2Career.com also ranked number 2 in the Inc. 5000 top human resources companies category.

5. Kohana Coffee
Entrepreneur Victoria Lynden founded Kohana Coffee in 2006 with a mission to ensure farmers get better compensated, help set up clean water sources in their communities, and give a percentage of Kohana’s earnings to farmers for their towns and education. Meanwhile, the company offers liquid coffee concentrate, roasted single-source beans, and a ready-to-drink coffee in a can. With a 2,417 percent three-year growth rate, Kohana made $2.8 million in sales last year and ranks number 171 on the Inc. 5000. The company ranked number 6 in fastest-growing food and beverage companies category.

6. LocalSearchForDentists.com
Going to a dentist, let alone finding a good one, is tough for a lot of people.LocalSearchForDentists.com helps dental practices up their online search, advertising, and marketing game. Founder and CEO Graig Presti is helping teeth-pullers attract more patients through local area search engine optimization, video marketing, reputation management, Google Adwords, and press release marketing. The niche Internet marketing services business, which has helped more than 10,000 dentists, is booming. With a 1,324 percent three-year growth rate, the company made $2.3 million last year. Ranked at number 357, LocalSearchForDentists.com added 18 jobs over the period.

7. Gossett Jones Homes
The construction firm Gossett Jones Homes builds custom single-family luxury houses and multifamily condos, duplexes, and townhouses based on energy-efficient construction. With a team of award-winning architects and interior designers, the company aims to help clients create homes that fit their lifestyle and budget. Co-founded by Jared Gossett and Matt Jones in 2010, the custom homebuilding firm made the number 427 slot on the list. With a 1,109 percent three-year growth rate, the company made $9.3 million in revenue last year. Gossett Jones Homes also sits at number 17 in the top construction companies category.

8. American Eagle Protective Services
Co-founders Bredgitt and Dan Walker, former members of the Texas Department of Public Safety, decided to take their experience in law enforcement and form American Eagle Protective Services in 2002. The company provides contract services to the federal government ranging from armed security services to facility maintenance and management services. Ranked number 532 on the 2014 Inc. 5000, the company has created 1,250 jobs and grew its revenue by 892 percent in three years to make $55.7 million in government contracts last year. American Eagle ranked number 619 on the list in 2013 and number 1,322 in 2012.

9. Lone Star Bloom
Thanks to services like 1-800-Flowers and FTD, the local florist is doomed. But Lone Star Bloom is using the floral downturn to its advantage by acquiring underperforming florists and using its scale to leverage better pricing from big suppliers. Founded in 2010, the company has grown its revenue by 869 percent to bring in $2.9 million last year. Ranked atnumber 553, Lone Star Bloom has added 36 jobs in the same three-year period.

10. Vital Farms
This three-time Inc. 5000 ranking company produces pasture-raised, certified organic eggs and poultry. Vital Farms does not use antibiotics. It packages eggs in 100 percent recycled pulp cartons, and sells its farm-fresh goods to the likes of Whole Foods. Matt O’Hayer, who got into the egg business in 1968 by selling cartons door-to-door, founded Vital Farms in 2009 with 20 hens. Since then, the company grew its revenue by 818 percent to bring its bottom line from $1.9 million in 2010 to $17.2 million last year. Vital Farms ranks at number 584 this year and ranked number 85 in 2013, and number 51 in 2012.

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An In-App Advertising Format Glossary for Mobile Developers http://www.phunware.com/blog/app-advertising-format-glossary-mobile-developers/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=app-advertising-format-glossary-mobile-developers#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=app-advertising-format-glossary-mobile-developers http://www.phunware.com/blog/app-advertising-format-glossary-mobile-developers/#comments Wed, 15 Oct 2014 11:28:46 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/blog/beacon-anyway-2/ Do you think most app developers are finding success with in-app advertising? Well, they are, and in-app mobile advertising revenues are exploding. They’ve quadrupled since 2011, and they’re forecast to be over $76B worldwide in 2017.1 That’s because click-through rates on in-app ads are much higher than the 0.1% rate for desktop web ads.2 They’re […]

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Blog-App-Advertising-Glossary

Do you think most app developers are finding success with in-app advertising?

Well, they are, and in-app mobile advertising revenues are exploding. They’ve quadrupled since 2011, and they’re forecast to be over $76B worldwide in 2017.1 That’s because click-through rates on in-app ads are much higher than the 0.1% rate for desktop web ads.2 They’re proven tools for driving success through app monetization.

That’s good news, isn’t it? After all, in-app advertising is easy. All you need is a bunch of banner ads, and suddenly you’re bringing in money every single minute. Everyone taps banner ads, don’t they?

So Many Ad Types!

If you’re done chuckling, you understand a basic problem. In-app advertising isn’t as simple as rolling out a bunch of banner ads. Over the past few years, we’ve seen a proliferation of different ad formats. There’s a complex arms race for mobile advertising dollars, with many tested and emerging ad formats to help you reach your business goals.

It’s also worth mentioning that the old days of static advertising are fading away. Static ads are being augmented with various kinds of attention-getting media, including animation, video and rich media (in-app games, for example). These opportunities for distinctive advertising boost complexity as well.

Since the in-app advertising format landscape is a little complicated, let’s clarify matters by covering the most common ad formats. Here the pros and cons for each ad type, including average click-through rates (CTR):3

Pros, Cons and Click-Through Rates of Mobile Ad Types

Native. With native ads, advertising content fits seamlessly in your app’s layout and user experience. Brand messaging or app downloads are delivered in a non-intrusive way, leading to a better user experience and a CTR of around 1.37 percent.4 But there’s a downside; development costs are higher than banner ads.

Ad-Example-Portrait

Partial-Page Interstitial Ad

Interstitial. These full-page ads appear between content pages, and are commonly used on games as content “interruptions” between app levels. Since they’re much larger than banner ads, they contain more content and can present more calls to action, resulting in a 5.70 percent average CTR. They’re also commonly used for branding. However, they’re more expensive than banner ads and typically take longer to develop. Despite those cons, interstitials are becoming the ad format most developers prefer.5

Exit Ads. Unlike banners, native ads and interstitials, which occur within an app, exit ads occur when a user taps the back button or home button. The user can either tap on the ad to engage with it further or tap on the X icon (or home soft key) to come back to the home screen. Available for branding or app downloads, exit ads can be an effective tool if you’re trying to avoid disrupting the user experience within your app.

Splash Ads. Splash ads are like interstitials or exit ads in that they’re full-page ad formats that stand apart from application functionality. Splash ads occur as an app is launched but before it fully loads, and can be used for branding, lead generation or app downloads.

App Lists. An app list ad format looks exactly like it sounds. Advertised apps appear in a list format for users to scroll through. With many apps in the list, odds are good that users will download something. One network observes a 7.14 percent CTR, which ought to make you take notice.

Panels. Panels are very successful ads, with a 12.60 percent CTR on one ad network.6 What is a panel? It’s akin to a list ad, but unlike list ads, which display limited advertiser information, panel ads reserve more real estate for each advertiser’s ad. Fewer ads means more opportunity for advertisers to promote themselves distinctively. It’s an attractive ad format, but since it can’t display as many advertisers as the list, it has its limits.

Slider. This format is a rising star, not very common as of yet, but becoming more popular because it offers a distinct user experience. An overlay unit on the bottom of a page mirrors touchscreen habits. If a user slides across the overlay, an entire ad page appears, unveiling a full brand experience.

Banners. Finally, the humble banner. Banners are common, cheap and easy to create, enabling massive reach. A wide variety of advertisers use them for lead generation, retargeting, brand building or app download. But they’re probably one of the least effective ways to drive revenue because click-through rates are relatively low, often around 0.20 percent, and they’re susceptible to accidental taps as well.7

As a developer, you have many different opportunities to drive your success with mobile advertising—and with other monetization techniques. By connecting with a trusted partner, you can find the right mix of ad formats, content, frequency and reach to help you achieve your basic business goals.

1Statista
2Forbes.com
7AppFlood
4MarketingCharts
5Statista
6AppFlood
7AppFlood

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11 Steps to Getting More Money Out of Your Mobile App http://www.phunware.com/mobile-solutions/11-steps-getting-money-mobile-app/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=11-steps-getting-money-mobile-app#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=11-steps-getting-money-mobile-app http://www.phunware.com/mobile-solutions/11-steps-getting-money-mobile-app/#comments Fri, 10 Oct 2014 12:38:46 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/blog/what-is-a-beacon-anyway-2/ $2.4 million dollars. At one point, that’s the amount of money Clash of Clans (a combat strategy game) made…in a day. That success led Supercell, the game’s developer, to a $3 billion valuation.1 That’s a lot of money. You’d probably be okay with a fraction of that success. To get there, it’s up to you […]

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Mobile-Apps-Features

$2.4 million dollars.

At one point, that’s the amount of money Clash of Clans (a combat strategy game) made…in a day. That success led Supercell, the game’s developer, to a $3 billion valuation.1

That’s a lot of money. You’d probably be okay with a fraction of that success.

To get there, it’s up to you to create a compelling app that attracts a large, engaged audience. But it’s also your responsibility to use tactics and strategies that will allow your app to produce ongoing revenue.

Monetization is more than just making money with your application. It comprises an evolving, complex set of opportunities to boost your profitability. Advertising is the primary component of monetization, but not the only one. Let’s take a look at how to turn your app into a consistent revenue stream with a comprehensive range of monetization tactics.

Steps to Mobile App Monetization

  1. Start with strategy.
    Without a monetization strategy, driving business success isn’t likely. Application development and monetization need to be part of the same overall strategic plan. Your plan must fit your target audience and overall objectives. What are your revenue goals? Which audience segments do you want to target? Do you want to increase your reach into certain demographics?
  2. Consider freemium.
    Many publishers today use a freemium model, in which the application download is free and there are items available for purchase within the application itself (extra features and functionality, virtual purchases, etc.). This friction-free download model lets you turn samplers into committed, engaged users.From 2012 to 2013, freemium saw 211 percent revenue growth, while paid and paidmium (in which users pay for the app and in-app purchases) declined2. Once you have an audience’s attention, there are many ways to monetize it, including mobile advertising, in-app purchases and subscription models.
  3. Find the right monetization partner.
    Advertising within your mobile app is a common monetization strategy, with click-through rates that exceed 12.5% in some cases.3 Since mobile app developers aren’t advertising experts, it’s critical to find a partner that understands both app development and advertising.Are you going to devote some of your app’s real estate to advertising? Are you going to purchase mobile ad space in other apps? The right mobile ad network will be able to help you with both strategies, and will offer features like:

    • A brand-safe publisher network to make sure your ads don’t appear anywhere you wouldn’t want them to.
    • Deep data sets that enable predictive mobile ad targeting for the highest ROI.
    • Stateside account managers who are available when you need them.
  4. Pick the right kind of in-app ads to fit your preferences and goals.
    For mobile advertising, one size doesn’t fit all. Maybe you don’t want your app to display banner ads, but you do want to use cutting-edge video ads. There are many kinds of mobile advertising, and each has its own benefits and drawbacks. Some come with higher development costs than others, but may drive higher click-through rates. You’ll have to find the right mix of ad types to hit your objectives. You may also want to consider native advertising options, where in-line or other native ad types mesh more seamlessly with your application experience.
  5. Don’t let advertising wreck your app.
    If the ads displayed in your app are relevant, attractive, appropriate for your customer profile, and they don’t block basic usability, many of your app’s users may end up tapping on them. But if ads pop up too often in your app, are ugly, block app functionality, or don’t align with your customer profiles, they may actually work against you. Your choice of ad network can play a role here, too: The right partner will help you make sure that your mobile ads are as successful as possible.
  6. Localize your advertising.
    Relevance is the core of successful advertising. Some mobile advertising partners can localize (or hyper-localize) your advertising to make it more relevant using technologies like beacons, Wi-Fi, and GPS. This technology allows real-time mobile ad targeting that connects to real-world customer experiences.Think about it: Would you be more likely to respond to a mobile ad containing a coupon for a certain store if you saw the ad when you were in the parking lot of the shopping center, rather than sitting at home in your bathrobe? Of course you would. And so would your users. In fact, 63 percent of smartphone owners say they are more likely to click on a mobile ad that offers a coupon to a nearby store.4
  7. Consider advertising outside your application to grow your audience and increase revenue opportunities.
    Look into CPI (cost-per-install) advertising, where you pay to promote your app in other applications, leading the audience to install your app. Since the cost of CPI depends on the number of installations the ad generates, the ad network has skin in the game. In other words, it’s in the best interest of the ad network to place your ads where they will be successful—the network only gets paid when someone installs your app.
  8. Push relevant information outside the app.
    Push notifications don’t necessarily generate immediate revenue, but they do improve long-term engagement with your app, giving advertising more time to work. Users who enable push have 88 percent higher engagement and nearly three times higher retention than those who disable it.5
  9. Explore in-app purchases and mCommerce.
    You can encourage users to spend money within your app. This approach works better for some apps than others. If you play mobile games, you know all about upgrades, consumables and in-app currency.Maybe your app isn’t a game, but think deeply for a moment about what you could sell through your app. Examples include extra functionality and tools, enhanced features and deeper content. Aside from their revenue potential, in-app purchases are also great for giving you insight into what interests your users—so you can do more of it.
  10. Look into offbeat monetization tactics.
    Consider some unusual ways to make money. For example, traditional media relies on subscriptions. Could you create a premium subscription model for your app that provides behind-the-scenes information or strategies, unlocks codes, or gives access to hidden levels? Could you develop auxiliary apps that attract new users and drive cross-promotion? Could you “white label” your code (license it to developers who use it as the core of their apps)? Are there opportunities to sell the data your app collects to marketers?
  11. Optimize your efforts.
    It’s much easier to optimize and track your efforts with robust analytics, and a data-driven strategy gives you better results and a better ROI. Learn which efforts are most successful with your audience, pursue those, and your margins will increase accordingly.

Finally, there’s one major consideration to keep in mind. Mobile monetization is an evolving space, with lots of innovation and evidence to help you tune your efforts. You need to keep in touch with trusted advisors who can help you stay attuned to emerging capabilities. There’s no reason your app can’t turn into a dependable revenue generator.

1Yahoo! Finance
2FierceMobileIT
3AppFlood
4eWeek
5Localytics

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7 CEOs Give Advice to First-Timers http://www.phunware.com/business/7-ceos-give-advice-first-timers/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=7-ceos-give-advice-first-timers#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=7-ceos-give-advice-first-timers http://www.phunware.com/business/7-ceos-give-advice-first-timers/#comments Wed, 08 Oct 2014 17:39:32 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/?p=14652 Forbes | October 7, 2014 8:41 AM | Joel Trammell “There are absolutely no free lunches in being a first-time CEO,” says Alan Knitowski, CEO of Phunware, in answer to my question for the third and last installation of this CEO advice series, “What advice would you give to professionals about to take on the CEO role for […]

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Forbes-logoForbes | October 7, 2014 8:41 AM | Joel Trammell

“There are absolutely no free lunches in being a first-time CEO,” says Alan Knitowski, CEO of Phunware, in answer to my question for the third and last installation of this CEO advice series, “What advice would you give to professionals about to take on the CEO role for the first time?” He sums up the challenge for new CEOs nicely. Rookie CEOs have less time than ever to show results, with little to no on-the-job training. Getting input from current and former CEOs is invaluable.

The answers from our seven intrepid tech CEOs focus on the importance of establishing two-way honesty and transparency, building a business for the long haul, listening more than you speak, choosing and committing to a leadership model, and knowing what you are getting into, among other insightful ones. You may read more about all seven CEOs in the article about what surprised them most about the CEO role.

Scott Abel, Founder & CEO, Spiceworks (CEO experience: Nearly 9 years): “Be open and honest with your employees. Truly be approachable. Build a culture where people are comfortable coming to you and telling you bad news. When startups go perfectly they’re hard – and they never go perfectly. We shouldn’t do anything that makes them harder. The more open and honest you are with your team about how you’re doing – with product traction, sales, and money in the bank – the more honest they’ll be with you about what’s working and what’s not inside your company.”

Dean Drako, President, CEO & Founder of Eagle Eye Networks (CEO experience: 22 years): “Build for success, not for an exit. You can be open to selling the company, but planning for it as your goal is a flawed strategy as it detracts from your customer focus. Most acquirers are interested in a successful company. Build one.

Measure results and adapt quickly.  Smaller companies can change and move fast – use that to your advantage.”

Thomas Ebling, President, CEO & Chairman of the Board, Demandware (CEO experience: 14 years): “Always remember this old adage: ‘You have two ears and one mouth for a reason.’ It is really important to avoid rushing to judgment; spend time listening and learning from people already at the company. I’ve always found that your new team will often have the answers to the challenges that led to the CEO transition, but they just weren’t being heard.”

Gregory S. Gilmore, CEO, Planview (CEO experience: Less than one year): “Don’t be an accidental leader. In other words, be intentional about your leadership model. So many times CEOs end up in the chair but don’t follow a model of leadership. If you are not providing the leadership your organization needs, people will seek it elsewhere, undermining your influence and credibility. You cannot allow that to happen. There are lots of resources available on leadership, but here’s what people miss: No model will work well unless you apply your specific talents and gifts – as well as your weaknesses and shortcomings – to it. This requires a clear assessment of your leadership abilities.

Culture is an important aspect of the organization. You have to be intentional in driving and permeating the culture you want your company to have. You do this by taking every opportunity to instill the value system you have established in your organization. You reveal and reinforce your value system by how you handle crises, incentives, recognition, and many other factors. All those things are critically important.

As a CEO you must be willing and able to embrace ambiguity. CEOs must understand that there is always some part of the job that they can’t control. Even if you take a command and control approach, you will not be able to regulate everything and may end up alienating your employees and other constituents. Those who cannot embrace ambiguity end up being demoralized and damaging the very culture they are trying to create.”

Alan S. Knitowski, Chairman & CEO, Phunware (CEO experience: 8 years): “The best advice that I can provide for a first-time CEO is to really, really understand what you are getting yourself in to before you say ‘yes.’ This is not only about ensuring that you are ready to accept the reality that you will be ‘on’ 24x7x365 from the day that you start until the day that you stop, but also that your family will be front and center to those most impacted when the inevitable intrusions of your business take priority over everything else in your life.

You need to have complete alignment at home with the realities of what you are going to be doing, and the sacrifices that will need to be collectively made by all of those involved and impacted. There are absolutely no free lunches in being a first-time CEO, for either you or your family, and you have to realize that your learning curve and the impositions of your business on your life should not be underestimated.

Finally, you should realize that you have to be the visionary, the evangelist, the brand ambassador, the operator and the fundraiser all in one. The glass needs to be half full, not half empty, and you need eternal optimism in your goal and quest to achieve the impossible. You will consistently have less resources, less money and less maturity than your peers, so you will need to make up for it with aggression, confidence, work, planning, commitment and a tireless pursuit of excellence in every facet of your business.  But enjoy it, because it is the most amazing and rewarding experience in business life.”

Mark McClain, CEO & Founder, SailPoint (CEO experience: 14 years): “Learn the difference between organizational health and organizational strategy. In business school, they teach you that the focus needs to be on organizational strategy. I’m completely on board with the thesis Patrick Lencioni puts forth in his book The Advantage: While strategy is important, organizational health is an even more critical long-term advantage.

Organizational health is more about making a company effective by creating a unified leadership team, aligning goals and having a clear purpose, and then communicating that vision to everyone within the organization. Just like we all do with our own physical health, we have regular company check-ups to ensure our company is healthy from the inside out. That way we can effect change before it affects us. I believe this is one of the primary reasons we’ve been able to attract and keep some of the best people in the industry, while fostering innovation and building exceptional customer relationships.”

Brian Tervo, President & CEO of North American Operations for TIE Kinetix (CEO experience: 6 years): “Understand that you do not know everything about the business no matter how much of a subject matter expert you may be. Build out a team of various disciplines that challenge each other to come up with the best idea, not just people who agree with your every word. Start with a communications survey to get a real picture of how your employees communicate and where they put their trust.  Operate with total transparency (and hold yourself to the highest moral and ethical standards!).”

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What Is a Beacon, Anyway? http://www.phunware.com/blog/beacon-anyway/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=beacon-anyway#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=beacon-anyway http://www.phunware.com/blog/beacon-anyway/#comments Tue, 07 Oct 2014 11:10:46 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/blog/push-ahead-push-notifications-edging-past-email-mobile-marketing-2/ Beacons play an important role in mobile location detection. When you think of a beacon, what comes to mind? A fire on a remote mountain? A blinking light at the top of a building? A lighthouse? Just like these traditional beacons, wireless beacons are designed to communicate an important message to everyone within a certain […]

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Beacon-Phone

Beacons play an important role in mobile location detection.

When you think of a beacon, what comes to mind? A fire on a remote mountain? A blinking light at the top of a building? A lighthouse? Just like these traditional beacons, wireless beacons are designed to communicate an important message to everyone within a certain proximity.

Beacons are small Bluetooth-enabled devices that transmit a continuous signal. The signal is “heard” by devices within a certain distance (from a few inches up to about a hundred feet) from the beacon. If a device has the relevant app installed when it recognizes the beacon, it will begin to communicate with the server to “ask” if it has any relevant information to share.

Beacon-DiagramMany companies today are using this location awareness as an opportunity to send contextually relevant push notifications to users’ devices—things like special offers, reminder and welcome messages, and other alerts.

In other words, beacons help people connect in context.

What Role Do Beacons Play in the Network?

Beacons are invaluable tools for mobile interaction, but they are only one element in the location technology universe. It’s important to understand the role of the different location technologies, and where beacons fit in.

GPS is accurate, but because it depends on satellite communication, it doesn’t work well inside a building or anywhere without a clear line of sight to the sky. Additionally, because GPS location detection is persistent, it can increase the load on network traffic and drain the battery of a mobile device.

Wi-Fi networks can be very precise at location detection, especially with multiple routers and add-on software to triangulate their signals—essentially turning the Wi-Fi network into a mini-GPS. Unfortunately, Wi-Fi users are required to consent to network connection, which adds an additional step to the interaction and may reduce the frequency of engagement.

Beacons provide the greatest accuracy; and with the introduction of Bluetooth Low Energy technology (BLE), beacons can be deployed almost anywhere. Whereas once the battery consumption of Bluetooth technology limited its applications, the advent of BLE has opened up a new world of location-enabled possibilities.

Each BLE beacon has a very small footprint and is designed to operate for years on standard coin cell batteries. BLE also supports enhanced range capability of up to 200 feet. Beacons are not only easy to deploy—the fact that they only interact with in-range mobile devices limits costly network traffic and reduces the drain on mobile battery life.

Beacons Help Drive User Engagement

Beacons enable businesses to send customers or visitors push notifications in real time, a practice that has been shown to deliver a 45 percent interaction rate (five times higher than that of traditional push messages).1

  • Retail locations use beacons to provide their most loyal customers (those with the store’s app on their smartphones) with customized offers while they are in the store. Beacons placed in a certain department or on a certain display can be detected by in-range mobile devices, and thereby trigger a message containing a coupon, special offer or additional product information.
  • Schools can use beacons to keep track of district-owned mobile devices. If a student moves a device beyond a specific threshold, like a classroom door, an alert can be triggered.
  • Similarly, hospitals can use beacons for asset tracking, thereby reducing time spent hunting down pieces of equipment (not to mention theft and loss).
  • Anyone in a large building or campus environment—hospitals, universities, municipalities and businesses—can use beacons to help people find points of interest or to trigger “you are here” notifications in a wayfinding application.

Beacons Deliver Valuable Interactions

Businesses are using beacons today to deliver engaging, interactive experiences. World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) is recognized for its intense fan interaction, so expectations for its mobile application were high. During WrestleMania 30, the organization’s flagship event, WWE implemented a highly interactive application using iBeacons. Beacon technology helped WWE deliver 44 campaigns resulting in 30 percent engagement, blowing traditional marketing campaign engagement out of the water.

Retail giant Macy’s recently announced plans to implement beacons in all of its stores after successful flagship test run. The retail implementation will be the largest to date, involving more than 4,000 beacons and creating new expectations for the in-store experience.

The benefits of beacon technology aren’t reserved for large organizations, however. Several companies have offerings that help small businesses and even individuals use beacon technology in daily life, and they’re barely scratching the surface of possible beacon use cases.

1PR Newswire. (2014) inMarket: Beacons Done Right Increase Interactions by 5x; Beacons Done Wrong Lead to App Deletion. Retrieved October 1, 2014

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5 Questions & Answers Shedding Light on How Americans Use Mobile Apps http://www.phunware.com/business/5-questions-answers-shedding-light-americans-use-mobile-apps/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-questions-answers-shedding-light-americans-use-mobile-apps#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-questions-answers-shedding-light-americans-use-mobile-apps http://www.phunware.com/business/5-questions-answers-shedding-light-americans-use-mobile-apps/#comments Mon, 06 Oct 2014 18:47:20 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/?p=14536 comScore | September 25, 2014 | Erin Baker Mobile has fast emerged as the primary platform for media consumption. However, as advertisers try to figure out how to best use mobile advertising to effectively reach their target audiences there is some hesitation around allocating budgets for mobile ad campaigns. Without context on how consumers are spending their time […]

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Shedding Light on Mobile Apps

comScore | September 25, 2014 | Erin Baker

Mobile has fast emerged as the primary platform for media consumption. However, as advertisers try to figure out how to best use mobile advertising to effectively reach their target audiences there is some hesitation around allocating budgets for mobile ad campaigns. Without context on how consumers are spending their time in the mobile environment, advertisers are left in the dark as to the best strategies to plan and execute these campaigns.

We recently released the U.S. Mobile App Report which highlighted the many ways in which Americans are engaging with mobile media today. Understanding the who, what, where, when and why of mobile app activity can help shed some new light on this growing medium that can help mobile advertisers become smarter about their campaigns.

Who is spending the most time in mobile apps? Millennials

Millennials (18-34 year olds) are a hot target for advertisers and they also tend to be heavier than average digital media users. So while every age segment is highly engaged with mobile apps, it’s perhaps not surprising that 18-34 year-olds far outpace the average. Specifically, 25-34 year olds are the heaviest mobile apps users with nearly 75 hours of mobile app usage per month. Following closely behind are 18-24 year olds who are spending more than 73 hours per month in mobile apps. By comparison, 35-54 year olds spend 64 hours per month in apps, while 55+ year olds spend just shy of 50 hours per month.

What are the most used apps overall? Apps produced by large media brands

The ranking of top apps is dominated by some of the largest digital media brands – Facebook, Google, Apple, Yahoo, Amazon and eBay. These brands account for nine of the top 10 most used apps, 16 of the top 25 and 24 of the top 50.

Facebook is the number one app in both audience size and share of time spent across all age groups, while Pandora Radio ranks as the second most used app for all age segments between 18-54 years old. With these kinds of apps, it’s easier to go in and out of them at an individual’s own convenience which allows people to multi-task and use them throughout the day – either waiting in line, on their way to work, etc.

Where are people spending time on mobile? In apps (especially their favorite ones)

Total U.S. digital media time spent grew 24 percent in the past year, driven primarily by the surge in mobile content consumption. Surprisingly, desktop now accounts for just 40 percent of digital media engagement, while mobile represents a solid majority at 60 percent. Even more noteworthy is that 52 percent of all digital media engagement, and about 7 out of every 8 on minutes on mobile, are driven specifically by mobile app usage.

Media-Consumption-Activity-on-Mobile-Devices_medium

Not only is most mobile time being spent in apps, but almost half of all app consumption occurs with an individual user’s single most-used app. And, most of the time spent in apps is incremental to traditional web usage – meaning that even though more people are spending time in apps, it’s for shorter spurts of time which makes grabbing consumers’ respective attention right away even more critical for advertisers.

When are people using apps? Every single day

The smartphone has become the on-the-go consumer’s personal assistant that travels everywhere they go and helps with anything they may need. Demonstrated by the vast majority of consumers using apps on their smartphones and tablets nearly every day, Americans have a difficult time living without their mobile devices.

In fact, more than half of smartphone users (57 percent) access apps every single day of the month, while almost 80 percent of smartphone users access apps at least 26 days per month.

Smartphone-Users-Accessing-Apps_medium

Why are people spending time in apps? To communicate and be entertained

Across all age groups, the greatest amount of time spent in apps is in leisure-oriented content categories, such as social media, entertainment and messaging. In particular, the Social Networking, Games and Radio categories contribute to nearly half of the total time spent on mobile apps.

The younger the age groups, the higher the concentration of leisure-oriented activity. In contrast, older age segments also allocate their time to more functional apps, such as in the Mail and Maps categories, in addition to the Games category.

Time-Spent-on-Mobile-Apps_mediumOverall, knowing more about target audiences and the behaviors that make up that audience offers the opportunity for advertisers to conduct successful digital ad campaigns, reaching individuals where they are spending their time.

For more insights on how mobile can help you better target your audience, download the U.S. Mobile App Report.

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How BYOD & Branded Mobile Apps Can Increase Your Sales http://www.phunware.com/mobile-solutions/byod-branded-mobile-apps-can-increase-sales/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=byod-branded-mobile-apps-can-increase-sales#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=byod-branded-mobile-apps-can-increase-sales http://www.phunware.com/mobile-solutions/byod-branded-mobile-apps-can-increase-sales/#comments Thu, 02 Oct 2014 18:16:09 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/?p=14498 BYOD is big. And the opportunities it provides for improving your company’s sales are even bigger. The bring your own device (BYOD) trend, in which employees use their personal smartphones and tablets for work purposes, has become standard practice in recent years. IDC predicts 328 million global workers will bring their smartphones to work by […]

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BYODBYOD is big. And the opportunities it provides for improving your company’s sales are even bigger.

The bring your own device (BYOD) trend, in which employees use their personal smartphones and tablets for work purposes, has become standard practice in recent years.

  • IDC predicts 328 million global workers will bring their smartphones to work by 2017, up from 175 million in 2014 and 132 million last year.
  • 80 percent of smartphones and 67 percent of tablets used in offices are employee-owned, according to a 2012 survey from McKinsey & Company.

    (Download this infographic for more data like this.)
  • 59 percent of companies say they have a BYOD policy, while 79 percent of companies that don’t support BYOD say some employees use personal devices at work anyway, according to Spiceworks.

We’re All in Love with Our Mobile Devices

BYOD is huge because many people today are so passionate about their mobile devices—just ask anyone waiting in a long line to buy the latest iPhone. A July 2014 Nielsen report provides another data point worth noting. The survey shows that U.S. iPhone and Android users spend 65 percent more time every month using mobile apps than they did two years ago.

At the same time, companies like BYOD because it boosts employee output. BYOD can add as many as 460 productivity hours a year for each mobile employee, according to Dell.

A Q1 2014 Adobe Digital Index report found that sales enablement content—such as up-to-the-minute data on a company’s customers, products and inventories—was 40 percent more engaging to a company’s internal app users than other types of corporate digital content.

BYOD gives companies a golden opportunity to put the content employees need and want to engage with on the devices they’re already using. So why do only 48.5 percent of companies provide mobile access to important sales and customer information?

The Benefits of a Branded Corporate App for Sales Teams

A branded, internal corporate app is an ideal way to bridge this gap by providing sales enablement content. It can:

  • Use push notifications to keep sales teams updated on inventories and price changes.
  • Give sales teams an updated product database with current pricing, images and descriptions to share with customers in the field—where buying decisions are often made.
  • Provide easy, on-the-go access to sales contracts, service agreements and sales reports.
  • Use gamification, competition and rewards to entice employees to increase their product knowledge.
  • Organize sales content intuitively, so product information is easy to access and remember.
  • Sales enablement content can be uploaded using your company’s existing CMS or digital asset management system.
  • Mobile apps can also be integrated with Salesforce and other CRM systems, enabling marketers to track the collateral salespeople use, among other benefits.

The upshot: A branded mobile app can give sales teams information and incentives to boost their performance—and your company’s revenues. Developing compelling, branded mobile apps for internal users is easier and more affordable today, thanks to cloud-based mobile app platforms.

For more information on the many business benefits of mobile apps, check out Tomorrow’s Mobile Applications Today: Drive Your Organization Forward with Next-Generation Technology and this infographic.

 

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The 5 Key Drivers of $700 Billion in Mobile Internet Revenue http://www.phunware.com/business/5-key-drivers-700-billion-mobile-internet-revenue/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-key-drivers-700-billion-mobile-internet-revenue#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-key-drivers-700-billion-mobile-internet-revenue http://www.phunware.com/business/5-key-drivers-700-billion-mobile-internet-revenue/#comments Thu, 25 Sep 2014 17:57:02 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/?p=14303 Venture Beat | August 27, 2014 9:33 AM | John Koetsier, VB Insight Mobile internet revenue will hit $700 billion annually in less than three years, according to a new report by research firm Digi-Capital. The key drivers? Mobile commerce, mobile advertising, in-app purchases, an emerging app-as-a-service model with mainly subscription revenue, and of course, maniacal attention on the […]

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Venture Beat | August 27, 2014 9:33 AM | John Koetsier, VB Insight

Mobile internet revenue will hit $700 billion annually in less than three years, according to a new report by research firm Digi-Capital.

The key drivers?mobile-apps

Mobile commerce, mobile advertising, in-app purchases, an emerging app-as-a-service model with mainly subscription revenue, and of course, maniacal attention on the part of app makers to their key metrics.

The absolute top driver? Mobile commerce.

“mCommerce will be the dominant business model, with $516 billion in sales driving more than 70 percent of all mobile internet revenue by 2017,” Digi-Capital’s Tim Merel told VentureBeat via email.

That’s Amazon.com, sure, but it’s also Wal-Mart. And buying your groceries at Publix. And using digital wallets to pre-order food on your way to the take-out restaurant, so it’s ready to go as you arrive, no questions asked and no cash required.

In other words, the driver is the ongoing colossal shift of commerce to digital, and within that, largely to mobile.

The second key driver is mobile advertising, which hit $7.1 billion last year, part of $43 billion in total digital advertising spend. According to Digi-Capital, mobile spending — which is one of the fastest-growing categories of digital advertising — will by itself surpass last year’s total digital ad spend within three years.

“Mobile advertising will deliver $52 billion in revenue in 2017,” Merel says.

$42 billion of that will be mobile web advertising, he predicts, while $10 billion will be in-app advertising. That’s a bold prediction, given that 80% of our mobile device time is currently spent in-app, as multiple studies have shown.

The third key driver is well-known to mobile developers and marketers: in-app purchases.

Last year in-app purchases of gems and cute virtual designer outfits took in over 90 percent of all consumer app revenue. By 2017, Merel says, the in-app purchase model will drive over $74 billion in mobile commerce — especially in games. According to Digi-Capital’s recent mobile internet investment review, in-app purchases monetize four times more effectively in mobile games than all other app types.

And that effectiveness is stimulating the emergence of the fourth key driver, the app as a service.

app-as-a-service-matrix

“New app as a service models are using the cloud to move beyond standalone device based apps, with free thin client apps such as Dropbox mixing data and media in cloud and on device,” Merel says. “Real-time cloud-based content updates are keeping users engaged, with strong ‘live ops’ teams supporting them.”

“AaaS” models use subscriptions, as well as other revenue models, to disrupt both enterprise mobility and non-game consumer apps. One example, as used by FitBit or similar fitness-monitoring devices: Sell the device and provide the app “for free.” Others, such as BodyMedia, have charged subscription fees to access the health data collected by their devices.

One final factor driving the explosion of mobile commerce by 2017 is simply that the best mobile monetizers just keep getting better.

app-metrics“Top-grossing apps look very different to other apps beyond just making a lot more money,” Merel says. “We see up to 35 times outperformance on core metrics comparing top 1 percent apps to top 5 percent apps by sector, with even greater gaps against lower rankings. For investors and entrepreneurs, a detailed understanding of how these numbers work could make the difference between good and great.”

The top 1 percent of apps — the prototypical creme de la creme — get 35 times more sessions per day than the top 5 percent, which are in pretty rarified territory themselves. They also have 20 times the lifetime value, nine times the conversion to paid rate, and 8 times average revenue per day per user.

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Push Ahead: How Push Notifications Are Edging Past Email for Mobile Marketing http://www.phunware.com/blog/push-ahead-push-notifications-edging-past-email-mobile-marketing/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=push-ahead-push-notifications-edging-past-email-mobile-marketing#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=push-ahead-push-notifications-edging-past-email-mobile-marketing http://www.phunware.com/blog/push-ahead-push-notifications-edging-past-email-mobile-marketing/#comments Tue, 23 Sep 2014 13:03:46 +0000 http://www.phunware.com/?p=13687 How many times do you look at your phone each day? Ten? Twenty? A hundred? More? We’re attached to our mobile devices because they bring us the content we love: informative, entertaining, work-related, money- and time-saving…we want it all. A recent survey of 1,200 U.S. consumers found that 57 percent have downloaded apps from their […]

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How many times do you look at your phone each day? Ten? Twenty? A hundred? More? We’re attached to our mobile devices because they bring us the content we love: informative, entertaining, work-related, money- and time-saving…we want it all.
Push-vs-email-graph

U.S. Adults’ Device Ownership as of Jan. 2014
Source: Pew Internet Project, Mobile Technology Fact Sheet

A recent survey of 1,200 U.S. consumers found that 57 percent have downloaded apps from their favorite brands. For people aged 18-34, the number is even higher at 71 percent. The survey also found that 68 percent have enabled push notifications on those apps (76 percent for the younger cohort).1

Push notifications are the most mobile-friendly marketing channel today, They’re short and sweet, and they can be finely targeted via the smartphone’s location technology and back-end analytics.

Push Notifications vs. Email

As you probably know from personal experience, consumers are now so jaded and bombarded with email that they largely ignore commercial messages, or at least filter them into sub-folders to be read or deleted at will.

Constant Contact, which sends millions of emails on behalf of its 500,000+ customers, found that the average email click-through rates hover below 15 percent for many key industries:2

  • Retail: 13.99%
  • Medical services: 11.19%
  • Real estate: 9.82%
  • Sports and recreation: 11.89%
  • Travel and tourism: 10.61%

Compared to email, push notifications knock it out of the park with 50 percent better open rates and click-through rates up to twice as high.3 So should you move all of your eggs into the push notification basket? Not so fast.

Push Notification Strengths

Relevance and Timeliness

With push, your messages are sent only to those consumers who have downloaded your app. They know who you are, care about your brand, and hope to derive some value from having your app on their device. Plus, with location awareness and sophisticated analytics, you can personalize your message and time it specifically to when the recipient is likely to engage with your app.

For example, a sports arena could send a welcome message as soon as fan enters the parking lot, offering directions right to the nearest concession stand or even the fan’s seats. A store or restaurant could send special offers to customers driving by, right at the typical time for a visit (happy hour, right after work, Saturday morning errand-time, etc.).

Engagement and Impact

Unlike emails, which can languish in a user’s inbox or get deleted without being opened, push notification messages appear right on a smartphone’s lock screen. They can’t be ignored—the recipient must act on each message (either by tapping to open it or tapping to dismiss it), which means that it’s easier for them to be driven directly to your app.

Unlike email, push notifications can’t be ignored. Users must act on them one way or another.

According to a recent study, users who enable push have 88% higher engagement and nearly three times higher retention than those who disable it. The study also found that an average of six in ten users users will return to an app within a month if they are being engaged with push messaging.4

Conversion Pathway

Push notifications move the user directly to the native app in moments. They don’t leave room for distractions or delays the way email does.

Wide Applicability

Push notifications are valuable for applications across a wide range of industries. Here are just a few examples:

  • Hospitals: Appointment reminders, paperwork reminders, prescription notifications.
  • Malls: Promotions for on-property events or amenities, welcome messages, tailored special offers and discounts.
  • Luxury real estate: Package, guest and valet notifications.
  • Retail store: Welcome and thank-you messages, tailored special offers and discounts, location-enabled product information.
  • Stadiums and venues: Welcome messages that link to wayfinding capabilities, real-time trivia and gamification, interactive in-event promotions.

Why You Need a Marketing Strategy for Push

You can’t simply treat push notifications as an extension of your email strategy. Your approach to push messaging should be fundamentally different. Done right, push notifications can be incredibly personalized, relevant and valuable to your users.

Do a poor job with push notifications, and you run the risk of losing this vital connection as users turn off push notifications—or worse, abandon your app. In general, relevance is the key. Make sure each of your push notifications is relevant to your user in terms of time, place and content—not just marketing for marketing’s sake.

Best Practices:

  • Communicate the value of push notifications before asking your users for permission to send them. Your users want to know: what’s in it for me? Will you be sharing timely reminders, offering unique discounts, providing insider updates?Transparency is critical. Be clear about how you will use data from the push notifications so your users can make an informed choice about whether to enable them—and then honor your commitment by staying within these boundaries.
  • Give users some control. Make it easy for them to choose which type(s) of push notifications they want to receive, how many (volume), and how often (frequency). Keep in mind that nearly 60 percent of users who have not enabled push notifications made that choice because they don’t want to get bombarded with messages.5
  • Mine your analytics to segment your audience and tailor your messages as much as you can. You will only rarely want to send the same message to your entire audience.
  • Be considerate in terms of timing. Although many people have their phones with them all the time, most of them do NOT want to get your coupon offer at 3:00 in the morning. Make sure you consider the user’s time zone in your notification schedules, and consider preserving some “quiet hours” during which you will not send operational push notifications.
  • Deploy urgency carefully. You may get a lot of attention with a notification sent at peak usage time with a “Hurry! Time’s running out!” message—but use this power judiciously. Users may get burned out on too much urgency.

Push Notifications May Be Just the Boost You Need

Marketing organizations across a wide range of industries are discovering the strategic value of push notifications. To reach your engaged customers—those who care enough about your brand to download and use your app—email just can’t match the timeliness, targeting, conversion and relevance of push notifications.

With careful planning and message development, push notifications can help you reach your customers more effectively than ever. It’s time to push your marketing to the next level.

1Responsys, Mobile Marketing Engagement Study
2Constant Contact FAQ
3Responsys, Mobile Marketing Engagement Study
4Localytics, Push Messaging Drives 88% More App Launches, 2014.
5Responsys Mobile Marketing Engagement Study

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